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The Bottom Line is a student-run weekly newspaper sponsored by the students of the University of California, Santa Barbara with a quarterly lock-in fee of $1.69 per student.

Created in early 2007 in response to concerns that there should be multiple news sources on the UCSB campus, The Bottom Line provides a printed space for investigative journalism, culturally and socially aware commentary, and engaging reporting that addresses the diverse concerns of our readership, including UCSB and its surrounding community.

The Bottom Line always welcomes new writers, photographers, videographers, and illustrators with experience ranging from none to professional. If you’d like to get involved, send an email to bottomlineucsb@gmail.com or attend one of our general meetings, which take place Tuesdays at 7 p.m. in the Annex (building 434 on a UCSB map).

All submissions, letters to the editor, and comments may be directed to content.tbl@gmail.com, or you may bring them to our office in the Annex. Any questions not related to content may be directed to bottomlineucsb@gmail.com.

The Bottom Line is published with support from Generation Progress, which is part of the Center for American Progress.

We look forward to working with you and providing you with reliable, high quality news.

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Arts & Entertainment

Folk No More: Mumford & Sons’ Third Album Shifts in Style

29 Apr 2015

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David Wills Staff Writer Illustration by Amairani Palacios, Staff Illustrator Fans of Mumford & Sons probably know the band’s signature sound: folky, banjo-filled songs that start softly and end explosively. Their style is unmistakable—or so you may have thought.

Through the Eyes of The Fallen; Hotel Modern’s Haunting Production of ‘The Great War’

29 Apr 2015

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Bryn Lemon Staff Writer As the centennial anniversary of World War I passes, the tragic loss of life can at times begin to feel remote; those history lectures whose dates and big battle names are the only resonating feature in the memories of subsequent generations. When my dad first proposed …