Home » About

The Bottom Line is a student-run weekly newspaper sponsored by the students of the University of California, Santa Barbara with a quarterly lock-in fee of $1.69 per student.

Created in early 2007 in response to concerns that there should be multiple news sources on the UCSB campus, The Bottom Line provides a printed space for investigative journalism, culturally and socially aware commentary, and engaging reporting that addresses the diverse concerns of our readership, including UCSB and its surrounding community.

The Bottom Line always welcomes new writers, photographers, videographers, and illustrators with experience ranging from none to professional. If you’d like to get involved, send an email to bottomlineucsb@gmail.com or attend one of our general meetings, which take place Tuesdays at 7 p.m. in the Annex (building 434 on a UCSB map).

All submissions, letters to the editor, and comments may be directed to content.tbl@gmail.com, or you may bring them to our office in the Annex. Any questions not related to content may be directed to bottomlineucsb@gmail.com.

The Bottom Line is published with support from Generation Progress, which is part of the Center for American Progress.

We look forward to working with you and providing you with reliable, high quality news.

Twitter Feed

Arts & Entertainment

“Weird Al” Yankovic Takes to the Internet With “Mandatory Fun”

21 Jul 2014

Weird Al Yankovic

Janani Ravikumar Staff Writer On July 15, “Weird Al” Yankovic released his 14th album of 12 affectionate song parodies, putting his own humorous spin on currently popular songs. However, unlike with his previous albums, Yankovic decided to promote “Mandatory Fun” in a different way: with a significant focus on the …

Little Fault Found in ‘The Fault in Our Stars’

3 Jun 2014

The Fault in Our Stars

Julia Frazer Staff Writer Photos by Madison King, Staff Photographer Like most of the people who attended the University of California, Santa Barbara Carsey-Wolfe Center’s early screening of the movie adaptation of John Green’s “The Fault in Our Stars” on May 28, I expected to cry. Within a few moments …