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Is My Job Worth It?

November 7, 2011 Opinions No Comments
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Lawrence He
Writer

Well, if you’re asking this question, chances are it’s not. Those people who have awesome jobs know they have awesome jobs. This question is asked by those who have crappy jobs and are wondering if the pain and time spent at their job is worth the income.

Start by asking yourself why you even need a job. The common reply would be “Of course I need this job! Everything costs money. Without a job how will I buy clothes and hang out with people?” Yes, many need to earn income to pay the bills, but I’m sure many more are overspending that money on excess clothes and alcohol. This leads me to my main point.

Why did you come to college? I’m willing to bet that having a job was a factor for over half of the people who have dropped a class late into the quarter. Understand that the main reason you came to college was to get a higher education, not to get a job. This means that your classes should have priority over the rest of your activities. If your job is affecting your academics then it’s not worth it. The sticker price of attending University of California Santa Barbara is roughly $10,000 a quarter. On average students take about four classes each quarter. So each class you take is worth $10,000 divided by four equals $2,500. So unless you make more than $2,500 per quarter from your job, it makes more sense to succeed in your classes.

Furthermore, having a crappy job turns you into “that guy.” “That guy” always complains about his job and how crappy it is without realizing that nobody wants to listen about how crappy his job actually is. Sure, it’s interesting to hear about his pain and suffering once, and maybe even twice if something unusually bad happened. But week after week, “I hate my job” gets annoying. But it’s not your fault if you’re “that guy;” it’s your job that’s turned you into this complainer. You just can’t help running around telling everyone how much you hate your job.

In the end, after you quit your job, you might have to end up asking your parents to lend you money. Some parents may deny giving their children money because they expect them to be independent. Some students may feel too independent to ask their parents for money. But in the end you should just let go of your pride and ask to borrow money from your parents. Chances are they’ll lend it to you if you need it. Quit your job, and you can quit complaining about how much it sucks.

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